A Digital Journal

Photography by Tony Triolo

Peace and Justice

A few weeks ago, I went on a tour of some of the monuments, memorials and museums commemorating Alabama’s civil rights struggle. One stop was at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery. The memorial, which opened in April 2018, is this nation’s first dedicated to the legacy of enslaved black people, and specifically to the over 4000 African American men, women and children who were lynched between 1877 and 1950 in this country. The 805 steel suspended monuments represent each county where lynchings took place, engraved with the names of the victims. A matching set of monuments lie outside, waiting to be claimed and installed in the counties they represent as a way to show which parts of the country have confronted the truth. Sadly, most remain on site.

The Peace and Justice Memorial sits atop a six-acre site near downtown Montgomery.

 

A visitor reads the inscriptions on the over 800 suspended steel monuments.

 

Madison County, Alabama’s memorial to lynching victims.

 

The monuments play against a constant cascade of water around the perimeter of the monument.

 

Over 800 suspended steel monuments represent the counties in the United States where lynchings took place.

 

Over 800 suspended steel monuments represent the counties in the United States where lynchings took place.

 

Replicated monuments lie flat outside waiting to be claimed by the counties where the lynchings occurred. Most remain unclaimed.

 

Students take notes on a school visit to the memorial.

 

A multi-figure monument to the transatlantic slave trade by artist Kwame Akoto-Bamfo.

March 18, 2020 Posted by | Alabama, Architecture, Historic Alabama, Photography | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments